Technology Assessment & Development

Power Sector, Supply Chain, Jobs, and Emissions Implications of 30 Gigawatts of Offshore Wind Power by 2030

Source/Sponsor: 
NREL
Creator/Author: 
Eric Lantz, Garrett Barter, Patrick Gilman, David Keyser, Trieu Mai, Melinda Marquis, Matthew Mowers, Matt Shields, Paul Spitsen, and Jeremy Stefek
Description: 
The Atlantic Offshore Wind Transmission Study evaluates coordinated transmission solutions to enable offshore wind energy deployment along the U.S. Atlantic Coast, addressing gaps in existing analyses.
 
State renewable energy targets and the national goal of 30 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind energy by 2030 show strong government support for offshore wind energy development. Meeting the goal of 30 GW by 2030 could unlock a pathway to 110 GW by 2050. Ensuring adequate and timely transmission access for offshore wind is critical to achieving state and national deployment goals.
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pdf
Publication Date: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021
2 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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Mapping Atmospheric Mysteries

Source/Sponsor: 
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Creator/Author: 
Wind Energy Technologies Office
Description: 

Drought conditions in Oklahoma are getting worse. Even minor drought can stress crops, delay germination, and shrink water supplies. Oklahoma might not have enough water, but it has plenty of wind, and its wind farms are booming.

Now, a massive data collection effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind Energy Technologies Office could help wind farms across Oklahoma—and the world—increase their energy production with a few strategic moves. Launching March 2022, the American WAKE experiment (or AWAKEN, for short) will capture precise data on how winds shift as they travel from one wind turbine to another or from one wind plant to another. This atmospheric map could help developers adapt their wind plant designs to produce more energy from the same winds, increase profits, and, eventually, reduce electricity prices for consumers.

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pdf
Publication Date: 
Friday, February 25, 2022
986 KB
Resource Type: 
Document
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Extreme wind shear eventsin US offshore wind energy areas and the role of induced stratification

Source/Sponsor: 
EAWE
Creator/Author: 
Mithu Debnath, Paula Doubrawa, Mike Optis, Patrick Hawbecker, and Nicola Bodini
Description: 

As the offshore wind industry emerges on the US East Coast, a comprehensive understanding of the wind resource – particularly extreme events – is vital to the industry's success. Such understanding has been hindered by a lack of publicly available wind profile observations in offshore wind energy areas. However, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority recently funded the deployment of two floating lidars within two current lease areas off the coast of New Jersey. These floating lidars provide publicly available wind speed data from 20 to 200m height with a 20m vertical resolution.

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pdf
Publication Date: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2021
1 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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Diagnosis of damaged tendons on a 10 MW multibody floating offshore wind turbine platform via a response-only functional model based method

Source/Sponsor: 
Elsevier
Creator/Author: 
Christos S. Sakaris, Musa Bashir, Yang Yang, Constantine Michailides, Jin Wang, John S. Sakellariou
Description: 

The problem of damaged tendon diagnosis (damage detection, damaged tendon identification and damage precise quantification) in a new multibody offshore platform supporting a 10 MW Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT) is investigated for the first time in this study. Successful operation of the multibody FOWT depends on the integrity of its tendons connecting the upper and lower tanks of the platform. Thus, early diagnosis of the damaged tendons is of high importance and it is achieved through a vibration-based methodology. Damage detection is accomplished based on the detection of changes in the vibration response power spectral density, while damaged tendon identification and damage precise quantification are accomplished through the Functional Model Based Method (FMBM). The FMBM is appropriately formulated in this study to operate with only vibration response signals. The employed vibration responses under healthy and damaged states of the FOWT platform are obtained from a numerical model describing the platform’s dynamics.

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pdf
Publication Date: 
Monday, May 31, 2021
8 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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Collocating offshore wind and wave generators to reduce power output variability: A Multi-site analysis

Source/Sponsor: 
Elsevier
Creator/Author: 
Roan A. Gideon, Elie Bou-Zeid
Description: 

Offshore wind and wave power are renewable energy sources that share the marine environment. Collocating these systems can reduce power variability; however, the extent of this differs between sites. Regional differences in combined system variability are investigated.

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pdf
Publication Date: 
Wednesday, September 9, 2020
2 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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A Reference Open-Source Controller for Fixed and Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

Source/Sponsor: 
EAWE
Creator/Author: 
Nikhar J. Abbas, Daniel S. Zalkind, Lucy Pao, and Alan Wright
Description: 

This paper describes the development of a new reference controller framework for fixed and floating offshore wind turbines that greatly facilitates controller tuning and represents standard industry practices. The reference wind turbine controllers that are most commonly cited in the literature have been developed to work with specific reference wind turbines. Although these controllers have provided standard control functionalities, they are often not easy to modify for use on other 5 turbines, so it has been challenging for researchers to run representative, fully dynamic simulations of other wind turbine designs. The Reference Open-Source Controller (ROSCO) has been developed to provide a modular reference wind turbine controller that represents industry standards and performs comparably to or better than existing reference controllers.

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Publication Date: 
Wednesday, April 21, 2021
1 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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Floating Frontiers: Offshore Wind in the U.S. Environmental Considerations

Source/Sponsor: 
The Business Network for Offshore Wind
Creator/Author: 
Ross Tyler
pdf
Publication Date: 
Thursday, August 9, 2018
1 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Vol. 1452, 2020

Source/Sponsor: 
Wind Energy Center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
Creator/Author: 
Multiple
Description: 
ACCESS WEBSITE HERE
 
On behalf of the North American Wind Energy Academy (NAWEA) and the International Conference on Future Technologies in Wind Energy (WindTech), we are pleased to present the accompanying papers that were prepared in association with the NAWEA WindTech 2019 Conference. The conference was organized by the Wind Energy Center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the European Academy of Wind Energy (EAWE) and with the support of the U.S. Dept. of Energy, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). The theme of the conference was the Grand Vision for Wind Energy, reflecting the consensus of the organizers that wind can provide a very large fraction of the world’s energy.  At the same time there are issues to be addressed before this vision can be fully realized.  Many of these issues were laid out in a article entitled “Grand Challenges in the Science Of Wind Energy,” which grew out of a recent International Energy Agency Technical Expert Meeting; many of the participants in the present conference were authors of that article.  The topics of this conference were chosen due to their relevance to the motivation of that article, namely the scientific challenges of supplying one third to one half of the North American electricity supply with wind in the next few decades.
 
The topics of the conference were the following
  • Wind Resource
  • Metocean design conditions
  • Turbine technology
  • Structures, safety, reliability
  • Controls: turbine and wind plant
  • Offshore wind energy
  • Wind plant design
  • Distributed wind power/hybrid power systems
  • Social science
  • Education/research: undergraduate – post doctoral

The accompanying papers were organized by the following scientific area leads:

  • Julie Lundquist, University of Colorado Boulder: Wind resource
  • James Edson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Metocean design conditions
  • Caroline Draxl, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Metocean design conditions
  • Todd Griffith, University of Texas Dallas: Turbine technology
  • Sanjay Arwade University of Massachusetts Amherst: Structures, safety, reliability
  • Rupp Carriveau, University of Windsor, Structures, safety, reliability
  • Eric Simley, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Controls
  • David Schlipf, University of Flensburg: Controls
  • Jason Jonkman National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Wind plant design
  • Matt Churchfield, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Wakes
  • Amy Robertson, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Offshore wind energy
  • Ian Baring-Gould, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Distributed wind power/hybrid power systems
  • Bonnie Ram, University of Delaware: Social science
  • Tom Acker, Norther Arizona University: Education

We would like to thank all of the scientific area leads and the many people who contributed to the success of the conference, particularly Jody Lally of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who coordinated all the logistics.

James F. Manwell Chair, NAWEA WindTech 2019 University of Massachusetts Amherst
Paul Veers Chair, NAWEA WindTech 2019 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

 

Publication Date: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020
Resource Type: 
Website
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Cost of Floating Offshore Wind Energy Using New England Aqua Ventus Concrete Semisubmersible Technology

Cover
Source/Sponsor: 
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
Creator/Author: 
Walter Musial, Philipp Beiter, and Jake Nunemaker
Description: 
Abstract: The State of Maine has a technical electricity generation potential from offshore wind of up to 411 terawatt-hours/year. Up to 88% of the state's offshore wind generation potential is in deep waters, thereby requiring floating offshore wind technology to access this resource. Given competing coastal uses, it is likely all the viable offshore wind energy resource is over waters deeper than 60 meters. However, relative to the 11.21 terawatt-hours of electric consumption by Maine (consumed in 2017), the technical offshore wind resource potential is abundant. This report provides cost, technological, and resource data for floating offshore wind technology deployment at a hypothetical reference site representative of conditions in the Gulf of Maine.

 

 

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Publication Date: 
Friday, January 17, 2020
1 MB
Resource Type: 
Document
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